Making sense of qualitative geometry

The case of Amanda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article presents a case study of a seven-year-old girl named Amanda who participated in an eighteen-week teaching experiment I conducted in order to model the development of her intuitive and informal topological ideas. I designed a new dynamic geometry environment that I used in each of the episodes of the teaching experiment to elicit these conceptions and further support their development. As the study progressed, I found that Amanda developed significant and authentic forms of geometric reasoning. It is these newly identified forms of reasoning, which I refer to as "qualitative geometry," that have implications for the teaching and learning of geometry and for research into students' mathematical reasoning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-94
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Mathematical Behavior
Volume36
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2014

Fingerprint

Teaching
mathematics
Geometry
Geometric Reasoning
Mathematical reasoning
Dynamic geometry
experiment
Experiment
Intuitive
Reasoning
Experiments
Learning
Students
Research
learning
student
Form
Model

Keywords

  • Geometric reasoning
  • Student thinking
  • Teaching experiment
  • Topological reasoning

Cite this

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Making sense of qualitative geometry : The case of Amanda. / Greenstein, Steven.

In: Journal of Mathematical Behavior, Vol. 36, 01.12.2014, p. 73-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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