Measurement of perceived school climate for active travel in children

Kelly R. Evenson, Robert W. Motl, Amanda Birnbaum, Dianne S. Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To describe the development of an original scale that measures perceived school climate for active travel in fourth- and fifth-grade girls and boys. Methods: The data were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to provide evidence of factorial validity, factorial invariance, and construct validity. Results: The CFA supported the fit of a 3-factor (encouragement, praise, and importance) correlated model for the school climate for active travel measure. This hierarchical model was invariant between sex and across a 7-month time period, and initial evidence for construct validity was provided. Conclusions: School climate for active travel is a measurable construct, and preliminary evidence suggests relationships with more support for active travel from friends and family.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)86-97
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2007

Fingerprint

school climate
Climate
travel
construct validity
Statistical Factor Analysis
factor analysis
evidence

Keywords

  • Children
  • Exercise
  • Physical activity
  • School

Cite this

Evenson, Kelly R. ; Motl, Robert W. ; Birnbaum, Amanda ; Ward, Dianne S. / Measurement of perceived school climate for active travel in children. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2007 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 86-97.
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Measurement of perceived school climate for active travel in children. / Evenson, Kelly R.; Motl, Robert W.; Birnbaum, Amanda; Ward, Dianne S.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 86-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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