Measuring Infants' Home Environment

The IT-HOME for Infants Between Birth and 12 Months in Four National Data Sets

Miriam Linver, Anne Martin, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. This article examines new conceptually derived subscales for the Infant-Toddler Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (IT-HOME) Inventory. Design. Data from 4 diverse national longitudinal data sets were used to assess several newly created subscales: the Infant Health and Development Program (N = 872), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care (N = 1,279), the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 2,374), and the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (N = 258). Validity and reliability of the newly created subscales were assessed. Results. In total, 7 new subscales emerged. Analyses demonstrate overall consistency in validity and reliability of these subscales. Conclusions. Although both observational and self-report items were included in analyses, observational items were in the majority. Researchers are encouraged to include observational items in future implementations of the IT-HOME. If designers of large-scale surveys find the cost of training observers to administer the IT-HOME prohibitive, they should consider selecting subscales rather than the entire Inventory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-137
Number of pages23
JournalParenting
Volume4
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2004

Fingerprint

infant
Observation
Parturition
Reproducibility of Results
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.)
Equipment and Supplies
Human Development
Child Care
Child Development
Self Report
Longitudinal Studies
health
Research Personnel
child care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Datasets
costs
Surveys and Questionnaires
Infant Health

Cite this

@article{52db07f14ac64e69a9469356bd358161,
title = "Measuring Infants' Home Environment: The IT-HOME for Infants Between Birth and 12 Months in Four National Data Sets",
abstract = "Objective. This article examines new conceptually derived subscales for the Infant-Toddler Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (IT-HOME) Inventory. Design. Data from 4 diverse national longitudinal data sets were used to assess several newly created subscales: the Infant Health and Development Program (N = 872), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care (N = 1,279), the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 2,374), and the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (N = 258). Validity and reliability of the newly created subscales were assessed. Results. In total, 7 new subscales emerged. Analyses demonstrate overall consistency in validity and reliability of these subscales. Conclusions. Although both observational and self-report items were included in analyses, observational items were in the majority. Researchers are encouraged to include observational items in future implementations of the IT-HOME. If designers of large-scale surveys find the cost of training observers to administer the IT-HOME prohibitive, they should consider selecting subscales rather than the entire Inventory.",
author = "Miriam Linver and Anne Martin and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn",
year = "2004",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/15295192.2004.9681267",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "115--137",
journal = "Parenting",
issn = "1529-5192",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "2-3",

}

Measuring Infants' Home Environment : The IT-HOME for Infants Between Birth and 12 Months in Four National Data Sets. / Linver, Miriam; Martin, Anne; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne.

In: Parenting, Vol. 4, No. 2-3, 01.05.2004, p. 115-137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Measuring Infants' Home Environment

T2 - The IT-HOME for Infants Between Birth and 12 Months in Four National Data Sets

AU - Linver, Miriam

AU - Martin, Anne

AU - Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

PY - 2004/5/1

Y1 - 2004/5/1

N2 - Objective. This article examines new conceptually derived subscales for the Infant-Toddler Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (IT-HOME) Inventory. Design. Data from 4 diverse national longitudinal data sets were used to assess several newly created subscales: the Infant Health and Development Program (N = 872), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care (N = 1,279), the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 2,374), and the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (N = 258). Validity and reliability of the newly created subscales were assessed. Results. In total, 7 new subscales emerged. Analyses demonstrate overall consistency in validity and reliability of these subscales. Conclusions. Although both observational and self-report items were included in analyses, observational items were in the majority. Researchers are encouraged to include observational items in future implementations of the IT-HOME. If designers of large-scale surveys find the cost of training observers to administer the IT-HOME prohibitive, they should consider selecting subscales rather than the entire Inventory.

AB - Objective. This article examines new conceptually derived subscales for the Infant-Toddler Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (IT-HOME) Inventory. Design. Data from 4 diverse national longitudinal data sets were used to assess several newly created subscales: the Infant Health and Development Program (N = 872), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care (N = 1,279), the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 2,374), and the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (N = 258). Validity and reliability of the newly created subscales were assessed. Results. In total, 7 new subscales emerged. Analyses demonstrate overall consistency in validity and reliability of these subscales. Conclusions. Although both observational and self-report items were included in analyses, observational items were in the majority. Researchers are encouraged to include observational items in future implementations of the IT-HOME. If designers of large-scale surveys find the cost of training observers to administer the IT-HOME prohibitive, they should consider selecting subscales rather than the entire Inventory.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548700677&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/15295192.2004.9681267

DO - 10.1080/15295192.2004.9681267

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 115

EP - 137

JO - Parenting

JF - Parenting

SN - 1529-5192

IS - 2-3

ER -