Merit in Meritocracy: Uncovering the Myth of Exceptionality and Self-Reliance Through the Voices of Urban Youth of Color

David T. Lardier, Kathryn Herr, Veronica R. Barrios, Pauline Garcia-Reid, Robert Reid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A disproportionate number of urban youth attend underresourced and segregated schools. While tenets of the American Dream are inculcated in urban youth, a dearth of educational resources is available to help realize this dream. This qualitative study explored the narratives of urban youth (N = 85), many of whom sought to be the exceptions, embracing higher education as a pathway to successful futures, yet few identified resources that would make access to higher education possible. The capital accrued in their communities allowed them to navigate their social environment; however, it was an insufficient bridge for future success in higher education. Furthermore, they espoused a belief in their own self-reliance as the one resource on which they could count on. Ironically, the youth also accepted “not making it” a result of their own shortcomings. We link findings to empowerment agents who would cultivate both bridging capital and critical consciousness among/for youth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)474-500
Number of pages27
JournalEducation and Urban Society
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2019

Fingerprint

meritocracy
myth
higher education
resource
resources
education
empowerment
consciousness
youth
narrative
school
community

Keywords

  • empowerment–social capital
  • exceptionality
  • meritocracy
  • self-reliance
  • urban youth

Cite this

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Merit in Meritocracy : Uncovering the Myth of Exceptionality and Self-Reliance Through the Voices of Urban Youth of Color. / Lardier, David T.; Herr, Kathryn; Barrios, Veronica R.; Garcia-Reid, Pauline; Reid, Robert.

In: Education and Urban Society, Vol. 51, No. 4, 01.05.2019, p. 474-500.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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