Message-framing effects on Indian females' mammography-screening intentions: Examining moderating and mediating relationships

Christopher Mckinley, Yam Limbu, C Jayachandran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study explored how distinct intervening factors explain the impact of messageframing appeals on Indian females' mammography-screening intentions. Contrary to prior investigations of early detection behavior, gain-framed messages were more effective at promoting mammography-screening intentions than loss-framed messages. Furthermore, results indicated that varying levels of need for cognition did not impact when gain- or loss-framed appeals were more effective, but rather how framing influenced message responses as well as message judgments. In particular, at high levels of need for cognition, gain-framed messages generated greater message attention and perceived message value than loss-framed appeals. Importantly, the findings from mediation tests revealed distinct pathways whereby both gain- and loss-framed messages indirectly influenced mammography-screening intentions. Specifically, gainframed messages were perceived as having greater credibility and loss-framed messages induced more personal worry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3541-3565
Number of pages25
JournalInternational Journal of Communication
Volume11
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2017

Fingerprint

Mammography
appeal
Screening
cognition
credibility
mediation
Values

Keywords

  • Mammography screening
  • Message framing
  • Message judgment
  • Message response
  • Need for cognition

Cite this

@article{817ae41038814be799079acc13700441,
title = "Message-framing effects on Indian females' mammography-screening intentions: Examining moderating and mediating relationships",
abstract = "This study explored how distinct intervening factors explain the impact of messageframing appeals on Indian females' mammography-screening intentions. Contrary to prior investigations of early detection behavior, gain-framed messages were more effective at promoting mammography-screening intentions than loss-framed messages. Furthermore, results indicated that varying levels of need for cognition did not impact when gain- or loss-framed appeals were more effective, but rather how framing influenced message responses as well as message judgments. In particular, at high levels of need for cognition, gain-framed messages generated greater message attention and perceived message value than loss-framed appeals. Importantly, the findings from mediation tests revealed distinct pathways whereby both gain- and loss-framed messages indirectly influenced mammography-screening intentions. Specifically, gainframed messages were perceived as having greater credibility and loss-framed messages induced more personal worry.",
keywords = "Mammography screening, Message framing, Message judgment, Message response, Need for cognition",
author = "Christopher Mckinley and Yam Limbu and C Jayachandran",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "3541--3565",
journal = "International Journal of Communication",
issn = "1932-8036",
publisher = "USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Message-framing effects on Indian females' mammography-screening intentions

T2 - Examining moderating and mediating relationships

AU - Mckinley, Christopher

AU - Limbu, Yam

AU - Jayachandran, C

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - This study explored how distinct intervening factors explain the impact of messageframing appeals on Indian females' mammography-screening intentions. Contrary to prior investigations of early detection behavior, gain-framed messages were more effective at promoting mammography-screening intentions than loss-framed messages. Furthermore, results indicated that varying levels of need for cognition did not impact when gain- or loss-framed appeals were more effective, but rather how framing influenced message responses as well as message judgments. In particular, at high levels of need for cognition, gain-framed messages generated greater message attention and perceived message value than loss-framed appeals. Importantly, the findings from mediation tests revealed distinct pathways whereby both gain- and loss-framed messages indirectly influenced mammography-screening intentions. Specifically, gainframed messages were perceived as having greater credibility and loss-framed messages induced more personal worry.

AB - This study explored how distinct intervening factors explain the impact of messageframing appeals on Indian females' mammography-screening intentions. Contrary to prior investigations of early detection behavior, gain-framed messages were more effective at promoting mammography-screening intentions than loss-framed messages. Furthermore, results indicated that varying levels of need for cognition did not impact when gain- or loss-framed appeals were more effective, but rather how framing influenced message responses as well as message judgments. In particular, at high levels of need for cognition, gain-framed messages generated greater message attention and perceived message value than loss-framed appeals. Importantly, the findings from mediation tests revealed distinct pathways whereby both gain- and loss-framed messages indirectly influenced mammography-screening intentions. Specifically, gainframed messages were perceived as having greater credibility and loss-framed messages induced more personal worry.

KW - Mammography screening

KW - Message framing

KW - Message judgment

KW - Message response

KW - Need for cognition

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85047997024&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85047997024

VL - 11

SP - 3541

EP - 3565

JO - International Journal of Communication

JF - International Journal of Communication

SN - 1932-8036

ER -