Multiple visions of an Island's past and some thoughts for future directions in Puerto Rican prehistory

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

My goals in this chapter are twofold: (1) review the salient themes addressed in the previous chapters, and (2) offer some insights into what I think connect the disparate bodies of evidence relating to environment, subsistence, settlements and polities, and religion and cosmology. In the preface, I observed that a book on the prehistory of Puerto Rico is contrived because things that were happening on this island were undoubtedly linked to affairs on neighboring islands and Central and South America. This truism notwithstanding, the chapter authors have demonstrated that from various perspectives there is plenty to say about what happened on Puerto Rico specifically. Some of the authors have explicitly tied the happenings on Puerto Rico to larger Caribbean-wide social, political, and environmental currents. As such, these studies both reflect and illuminate issues of fundamental importance to the Caribbean, lowland South America, and Central America. This overextended justification for a book on the prehistory of Puerto Rico may be summarized by saying "we and the Native Americans who occupied the island were and are not alone.".

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAncient Borinquen
Subtitle of host publicationArchaeology and Ethnohistory of Native Puerto Rico
PublisherThe University of Alabama Press
Pages353-363
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9780817352387
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2005

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Puerto Rico
prehistory
Central America
Religion
Puerto Rican
Prehistory
evidence

Cite this

Siegel, P. (2005). Multiple visions of an Island's past and some thoughts for future directions in Puerto Rican prehistory. In Ancient Borinquen: Archaeology and Ethnohistory of Native Puerto Rico (pp. 353-363). The University of Alabama Press.
Siegel, Peter. / Multiple visions of an Island's past and some thoughts for future directions in Puerto Rican prehistory. Ancient Borinquen: Archaeology and Ethnohistory of Native Puerto Rico. The University of Alabama Press, 2005. pp. 353-363
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Siegel, P 2005, Multiple visions of an Island's past and some thoughts for future directions in Puerto Rican prehistory. in Ancient Borinquen: Archaeology and Ethnohistory of Native Puerto Rico. The University of Alabama Press, pp. 353-363.

Multiple visions of an Island's past and some thoughts for future directions in Puerto Rican prehistory. / Siegel, Peter.

Ancient Borinquen: Archaeology and Ethnohistory of Native Puerto Rico. The University of Alabama Press, 2005. p. 353-363.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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Siegel P. Multiple visions of an Island's past and some thoughts for future directions in Puerto Rican prehistory. In Ancient Borinquen: Archaeology and Ethnohistory of Native Puerto Rico. The University of Alabama Press. 2005. p. 353-363