Navicular drop before and after fatigue of the ankle invertor muscles

Fredrick Gardin, David Middlemas, Jennifer L. Williams, Steven Leigh, Robert Horn, Monique Mokha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Context: Navicular drop is widely believed to be an indicator of elevated susceptibility to pronation-related injuries, which may be increased by fatigue in the muscles that dynamically support the medial longitudinal arch. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate navicular drop before and after fatigue of the ankle invertor muscles among individuals with different foot types. Participants: 20 male and 16 female recreationally active, college-age volunteers (20.03 ± 1.48 years of age). Methods: Navicular drop was measured before and after inducing fatigue in the ankle invertor muscles. Participants' foot types were classified as high-arch, neutral, or low-arch. Results: There was no interaction between foot type and trial, and no main effect for trial. A main effect for foot type was significant (p =.001). Intra-class correlation coefficients for prefatigue and postfatigue measurements indicated good internal consistency. Conclusion: Our findings failed to provide any evidence to support the existence of a relationship between ankle invertor muscle fatigue and static measurements of change in navicular height from a sitting to standing position.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-39
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2013

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Ankle
Fatigue
Foot
Muscles
Muscle Fatigue
Pronation
Posture
Volunteers
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Foot pronation
  • Muscular fatigue
  • Posterior tibialis muscle

Cite this

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title = "Navicular drop before and after fatigue of the ankle invertor muscles",
abstract = "Context: Navicular drop is widely believed to be an indicator of elevated susceptibility to pronation-related injuries, which may be increased by fatigue in the muscles that dynamically support the medial longitudinal arch. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate navicular drop before and after fatigue of the ankle invertor muscles among individuals with different foot types. Participants: 20 male and 16 female recreationally active, college-age volunteers (20.03 ± 1.48 years of age). Methods: Navicular drop was measured before and after inducing fatigue in the ankle invertor muscles. Participants' foot types were classified as high-arch, neutral, or low-arch. Results: There was no interaction between foot type and trial, and no main effect for trial. A main effect for foot type was significant (p =.001). Intra-class correlation coefficients for prefatigue and postfatigue measurements indicated good internal consistency. Conclusion: Our findings failed to provide any evidence to support the existence of a relationship between ankle invertor muscle fatigue and static measurements of change in navicular height from a sitting to standing position.",
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Navicular drop before and after fatigue of the ankle invertor muscles. / Gardin, Fredrick; Middlemas, David; Williams, Jennifer L.; Leigh, Steven; Horn, Robert; Mokha, Monique.

In: International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, Vol. 18, No. 6, 01.01.2013, p. 36-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Gardin, Fredrick

AU - Middlemas, David

AU - Williams, Jennifer L.

AU - Leigh, Steven

AU - Horn, Robert

AU - Mokha, Monique

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N2 - Context: Navicular drop is widely believed to be an indicator of elevated susceptibility to pronation-related injuries, which may be increased by fatigue in the muscles that dynamically support the medial longitudinal arch. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate navicular drop before and after fatigue of the ankle invertor muscles among individuals with different foot types. Participants: 20 male and 16 female recreationally active, college-age volunteers (20.03 ± 1.48 years of age). Methods: Navicular drop was measured before and after inducing fatigue in the ankle invertor muscles. Participants' foot types were classified as high-arch, neutral, or low-arch. Results: There was no interaction between foot type and trial, and no main effect for trial. A main effect for foot type was significant (p =.001). Intra-class correlation coefficients for prefatigue and postfatigue measurements indicated good internal consistency. Conclusion: Our findings failed to provide any evidence to support the existence of a relationship between ankle invertor muscle fatigue and static measurements of change in navicular height from a sitting to standing position.

AB - Context: Navicular drop is widely believed to be an indicator of elevated susceptibility to pronation-related injuries, which may be increased by fatigue in the muscles that dynamically support the medial longitudinal arch. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate navicular drop before and after fatigue of the ankle invertor muscles among individuals with different foot types. Participants: 20 male and 16 female recreationally active, college-age volunteers (20.03 ± 1.48 years of age). Methods: Navicular drop was measured before and after inducing fatigue in the ankle invertor muscles. Participants' foot types were classified as high-arch, neutral, or low-arch. Results: There was no interaction between foot type and trial, and no main effect for trial. A main effect for foot type was significant (p =.001). Intra-class correlation coefficients for prefatigue and postfatigue measurements indicated good internal consistency. Conclusion: Our findings failed to provide any evidence to support the existence of a relationship between ankle invertor muscle fatigue and static measurements of change in navicular height from a sitting to standing position.

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