Net-zero water management: Achieving energy-positive municipal water supply

James D. Englehardt, Tingting Wu, Frederick Bloetscher, Yang Deng, Piet Du Pisani, Sebastian Eilert, Samir Elmir, Tianjiao Guo, Joseph Jacangelo, Mark LeChevallier, Harold Leverenz, Erika Mancha, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Bahman Sheikh, Eva Steinle-Darling, George Tchobanoglous

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Net-zero water (NZW) is a new vision for municipal water management, in which significant water is neither imported to, nor exported from the service area, i.e. local water independence. While such a system has long been possible in areas of sufficient water supply and/or sparse population, it is now becoming possible and economical for municipal systems in virtually any modern watershed, through the use of emerging direct potable reuse (DPR) technology. In fact, current implementations are producing design and operating data. Moreover, distributed NZW systems recycling at a high rate are projected to be capable of energy-positive operation, saving more domestic hot water energy than is consumed in treatment. However, NZW and DPR approaches vary widely in terms of source water, source segregation, treatment, and recycling rate. In this study, a workshop was convened to assemble and synthesize a broad cross-section of current NZW and DPR experience, to develop recommendations for water management planning. It was concluded that technology is currently emerging to support widespread NZW management. Recommendations included the introduction of NZW systems into new construction, to be supported by controlled demonstration projects over periods of two years or more; development of supporting regulatory structure with public engagement; development of real-time water quality monitoring devices; and retention of the term "net-zero water" to signify a new water management vision to advance water and energy autonomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)250-260
Number of pages11
JournalEnvironmental Science: Water Research and Technology
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2016

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Water management
Water supply
water management
water supply
energy
Water
water
Recycling
recycling
autonomy
Watersheds
Water quality
cross section
Demonstrations
watershed
water quality
Planning

Cite this

Englehardt, J. D., Wu, T., Bloetscher, F., Deng, Y., Du Pisani, P., Eilert, S., ... Tchobanoglous, G. (2016). Net-zero water management: Achieving energy-positive municipal water supply. Environmental Science: Water Research and Technology, 2(2), 250-260. https://doi.org/10.1039/c5ew00204d
Englehardt, James D. ; Wu, Tingting ; Bloetscher, Frederick ; Deng, Yang ; Du Pisani, Piet ; Eilert, Sebastian ; Elmir, Samir ; Guo, Tianjiao ; Jacangelo, Joseph ; LeChevallier, Mark ; Leverenz, Harold ; Mancha, Erika ; Plater-Zyberk, Elizabeth ; Sheikh, Bahman ; Steinle-Darling, Eva ; Tchobanoglous, George. / Net-zero water management : Achieving energy-positive municipal water supply. In: Environmental Science: Water Research and Technology. 2016 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 250-260.
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Englehardt, JD, Wu, T, Bloetscher, F, Deng, Y, Du Pisani, P, Eilert, S, Elmir, S, Guo, T, Jacangelo, J, LeChevallier, M, Leverenz, H, Mancha, E, Plater-Zyberk, E, Sheikh, B, Steinle-Darling, E & Tchobanoglous, G 2016, 'Net-zero water management: Achieving energy-positive municipal water supply', Environmental Science: Water Research and Technology, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 250-260. https://doi.org/10.1039/c5ew00204d

Net-zero water management : Achieving energy-positive municipal water supply. / Englehardt, James D.; Wu, Tingting; Bloetscher, Frederick; Deng, Yang; Du Pisani, Piet; Eilert, Sebastian; Elmir, Samir; Guo, Tianjiao; Jacangelo, Joseph; LeChevallier, Mark; Leverenz, Harold; Mancha, Erika; Plater-Zyberk, Elizabeth; Sheikh, Bahman; Steinle-Darling, Eva; Tchobanoglous, George.

In: Environmental Science: Water Research and Technology, Vol. 2, No. 2, 01.01.2016, p. 250-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Net-zero water management

T2 - Achieving energy-positive municipal water supply

AU - Englehardt, James D.

AU - Wu, Tingting

AU - Bloetscher, Frederick

AU - Deng, Yang

AU - Du Pisani, Piet

AU - Eilert, Sebastian

AU - Elmir, Samir

AU - Guo, Tianjiao

AU - Jacangelo, Joseph

AU - LeChevallier, Mark

AU - Leverenz, Harold

AU - Mancha, Erika

AU - Plater-Zyberk, Elizabeth

AU - Sheikh, Bahman

AU - Steinle-Darling, Eva

AU - Tchobanoglous, George

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Net-zero water (NZW) is a new vision for municipal water management, in which significant water is neither imported to, nor exported from the service area, i.e. local water independence. While such a system has long been possible in areas of sufficient water supply and/or sparse population, it is now becoming possible and economical for municipal systems in virtually any modern watershed, through the use of emerging direct potable reuse (DPR) technology. In fact, current implementations are producing design and operating data. Moreover, distributed NZW systems recycling at a high rate are projected to be capable of energy-positive operation, saving more domestic hot water energy than is consumed in treatment. However, NZW and DPR approaches vary widely in terms of source water, source segregation, treatment, and recycling rate. In this study, a workshop was convened to assemble and synthesize a broad cross-section of current NZW and DPR experience, to develop recommendations for water management planning. It was concluded that technology is currently emerging to support widespread NZW management. Recommendations included the introduction of NZW systems into new construction, to be supported by controlled demonstration projects over periods of two years or more; development of supporting regulatory structure with public engagement; development of real-time water quality monitoring devices; and retention of the term "net-zero water" to signify a new water management vision to advance water and energy autonomy.

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