Pathways of influence in school-based mentoring: The mediating role of parent and teacher relationships

Christian S. Chan, Jean E. Rhodes, Waylon J. Howard, Sarah Lowe, Sarah E.O. Schwartz, Carla Herrera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explores the pathways through which school-based mentoring relationships are associated with improvements in elementary and high school students' socio-emotional, academic, and behavioral outcomes. Participants in the study (N= 526) were part of a national evaluation of the Big Brothers Big Sisters school-based mentoring programs, all of whom had been randomly assigned to receive mentoring at their schools over the course of one academic year. Students were assessed at the beginning and end of the school year. The results of structural equation modeling showed that mentoring relationship quality, as measured by the Youth-Centered Relationship scale and the Youth's Emotional Engagement scale, was significantly associated with positive changes in youths' relationships with parents and teachers, as measured by subscales of the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment, the Teacher Relationship Quality scale, and the Hemingway Measure of Adolescent Connectedness. Higher quality relationships with parents and teachers, in turn, were significantly associated with better youth outcomes, including self-esteem, academic attitudes, prosocial behaviors, and misconduct. The effect sizes of the associations ranged from 0.12 to 0.52. Mediation analysis found that mentoring relationship quality was indirectly associated with some of the outcomes through its association with improved parent and teacher relationships. Implications of the findings for theory and research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-142
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of School Psychology
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2013

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mentoring
parents
teacher
school
Siblings
Parents
Students
Self Concept
self-esteem
mediation
student
Mentoring
adolescent
Equipment and Supplies
evaluation
Research

Keywords

  • Mentoring
  • Prevention
  • School-based program

Cite this

Chan, C. S., Rhodes, J. E., Howard, W. J., Lowe, S., Schwartz, S. E. O., & Herrera, C. (2013). Pathways of influence in school-based mentoring: The mediating role of parent and teacher relationships. Journal of School Psychology, 51(1), 129-142. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2012.10.001
Chan, Christian S. ; Rhodes, Jean E. ; Howard, Waylon J. ; Lowe, Sarah ; Schwartz, Sarah E.O. ; Herrera, Carla. / Pathways of influence in school-based mentoring : The mediating role of parent and teacher relationships. In: Journal of School Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 51, No. 1. pp. 129-142.
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Pathways of influence in school-based mentoring : The mediating role of parent and teacher relationships. / Chan, Christian S.; Rhodes, Jean E.; Howard, Waylon J.; Lowe, Sarah; Schwartz, Sarah E.O.; Herrera, Carla.

In: Journal of School Psychology, Vol. 51, No. 1, 01.02.2013, p. 129-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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