Performance of a combination process of UV/H2O2/ micro-aeration for oxidation of dichloroacetic acid in drinking water

Wen Hai Chu, N. Y. Gao, Yang Deng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The decomposition of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) in water using a UV/H2O2/micro-aeration process was investigated in this paper. DCAA cannot be removed by UV radiation, H2O2 oxidation or micro-aeration alone, while UV/H2O2/micro-aeration combination processes have proved effective and can degrade this compound completely. With initial concentrations of about 110 μg/L, more than 95.1% of DCAA can be removed in 180 min under UV intensity of 1048.7 μW/cm2, H2O2 dosage of 30 mg/L and micro-aeration flow rate of 2 L/min. However, more than 30 μg/L of DCAA was left after 180 min by UV/H2O2 combination process without micro-aeration with the same UV intensity and H2O2 dosage. The effects of applied UV radiation intensity, H2O2 dose, initial DCAA concentration and pH on the degradation of DCAA have been examined in this study. Degradation mechanisms of DCAA with hydroxyl radical oxidation have been discussed. The removal rate of DCAA was sensitive to operational parameters. There was a linear relationship between rate constant k and UV intensity and initial H2O2 concentration, which indicated that a higher removal capacity can be achieved by improvement of both factors. A newly found nitrogenous disinfection by-product (N-DBP)-DCAcAm, which has the potential to form DCAA, was easier to remove than DCAA by UV/H2O2 and UV/H2O2/micro-aeration processes. Finally, a preliminary cost comparison revealed that the UV/H2O2/micro-aeration process was more cost-effective than the UV/H2O2 process in the removal of DCAA from drinking water.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)233-238
Number of pages6
JournalClean - Soil, Air, Water
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2009

Fingerprint

Dichloroacetic Acid
Dichloroacetic acid
Potable water
Drinking Water
aeration
drinking water
oxidation
Oxidation
acid
Ultraviolet radiation
Degradation
degradation
Disinfection
hydroxyl radical
cost
Hydroxyl Radical
disinfection
Byproducts
Costs

Keywords

  • Cost analysis
  • Dichloroacetic acid
  • Drinking water
  • Hydroxyl radical
  • Reaction kinetics
  • UV/HO/micro-aeration process

Cite this

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title = "Performance of a combination process of UV/H2O2/ micro-aeration for oxidation of dichloroacetic acid in drinking water",
abstract = "The decomposition of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) in water using a UV/H2O2/micro-aeration process was investigated in this paper. DCAA cannot be removed by UV radiation, H2O2 oxidation or micro-aeration alone, while UV/H2O2/micro-aeration combination processes have proved effective and can degrade this compound completely. With initial concentrations of about 110 μg/L, more than 95.1{\%} of DCAA can be removed in 180 min under UV intensity of 1048.7 μW/cm2, H2O2 dosage of 30 mg/L and micro-aeration flow rate of 2 L/min. However, more than 30 μg/L of DCAA was left after 180 min by UV/H2O2 combination process without micro-aeration with the same UV intensity and H2O2 dosage. The effects of applied UV radiation intensity, H2O2 dose, initial DCAA concentration and pH on the degradation of DCAA have been examined in this study. Degradation mechanisms of DCAA with hydroxyl radical oxidation have been discussed. The removal rate of DCAA was sensitive to operational parameters. There was a linear relationship between rate constant k and UV intensity and initial H2O2 concentration, which indicated that a higher removal capacity can be achieved by improvement of both factors. A newly found nitrogenous disinfection by-product (N-DBP)-DCAcAm, which has the potential to form DCAA, was easier to remove than DCAA by UV/H2O2 and UV/H2O2/micro-aeration processes. Finally, a preliminary cost comparison revealed that the UV/H2O2/micro-aeration process was more cost-effective than the UV/H2O2 process in the removal of DCAA from drinking water.",
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Performance of a combination process of UV/H2O2/ micro-aeration for oxidation of dichloroacetic acid in drinking water. / Chu, Wen Hai; Gao, N. Y.; Deng, Yang.

In: Clean - Soil, Air, Water, Vol. 37, No. 3, 01.03.2009, p. 233-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Performance of a combination process of UV/H2O2/ micro-aeration for oxidation of dichloroacetic acid in drinking water

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N2 - The decomposition of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) in water using a UV/H2O2/micro-aeration process was investigated in this paper. DCAA cannot be removed by UV radiation, H2O2 oxidation or micro-aeration alone, while UV/H2O2/micro-aeration combination processes have proved effective and can degrade this compound completely. With initial concentrations of about 110 μg/L, more than 95.1% of DCAA can be removed in 180 min under UV intensity of 1048.7 μW/cm2, H2O2 dosage of 30 mg/L and micro-aeration flow rate of 2 L/min. However, more than 30 μg/L of DCAA was left after 180 min by UV/H2O2 combination process without micro-aeration with the same UV intensity and H2O2 dosage. The effects of applied UV radiation intensity, H2O2 dose, initial DCAA concentration and pH on the degradation of DCAA have been examined in this study. Degradation mechanisms of DCAA with hydroxyl radical oxidation have been discussed. The removal rate of DCAA was sensitive to operational parameters. There was a linear relationship between rate constant k and UV intensity and initial H2O2 concentration, which indicated that a higher removal capacity can be achieved by improvement of both factors. A newly found nitrogenous disinfection by-product (N-DBP)-DCAcAm, which has the potential to form DCAA, was easier to remove than DCAA by UV/H2O2 and UV/H2O2/micro-aeration processes. Finally, a preliminary cost comparison revealed that the UV/H2O2/micro-aeration process was more cost-effective than the UV/H2O2 process in the removal of DCAA from drinking water.

AB - The decomposition of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) in water using a UV/H2O2/micro-aeration process was investigated in this paper. DCAA cannot be removed by UV radiation, H2O2 oxidation or micro-aeration alone, while UV/H2O2/micro-aeration combination processes have proved effective and can degrade this compound completely. With initial concentrations of about 110 μg/L, more than 95.1% of DCAA can be removed in 180 min under UV intensity of 1048.7 μW/cm2, H2O2 dosage of 30 mg/L and micro-aeration flow rate of 2 L/min. However, more than 30 μg/L of DCAA was left after 180 min by UV/H2O2 combination process without micro-aeration with the same UV intensity and H2O2 dosage. The effects of applied UV radiation intensity, H2O2 dose, initial DCAA concentration and pH on the degradation of DCAA have been examined in this study. Degradation mechanisms of DCAA with hydroxyl radical oxidation have been discussed. The removal rate of DCAA was sensitive to operational parameters. There was a linear relationship between rate constant k and UV intensity and initial H2O2 concentration, which indicated that a higher removal capacity can be achieved by improvement of both factors. A newly found nitrogenous disinfection by-product (N-DBP)-DCAcAm, which has the potential to form DCAA, was easier to remove than DCAA by UV/H2O2 and UV/H2O2/micro-aeration processes. Finally, a preliminary cost comparison revealed that the UV/H2O2/micro-aeration process was more cost-effective than the UV/H2O2 process in the removal of DCAA from drinking water.

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