Racial and ethnic differences in perceptions of campus climate related to sexual violence

S. A.N. Silvera, Eva Goldfarb, A. S. Birnbaum, A. Kaplan, J. Bavaro, M. Guzman, Lisa Lieberman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To assess perceptions of university institutional climate related to sexual violence and whether these differed by race/ethnicity. Participants: Matriculated undergraduates > age 18 (n = 1028). Methods: Students were invited via campus email to participate in an online survey. Results: Overall, only 20% agreed that the university is creating an environment in which unwanted sexual experiences seemed common or normal, but these findings differed by race. Black students were more likely than their white peers to feel the university is creating an environment in which unwanted sexual experiences seem common or normal (37.3% vs. 19.7%, p <.001) and creating an environment in which such instances were more likely to occur (33.3% vs. 13.4%, p <.001). Conclusions: Data suggest that while students generally perceive that the university is working to create a positive and safe climate, these perceptions vary by race. Further investigation is necessary to better understand the concerns of students of color.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of American College Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Campus climate
  • race/ethnicity
  • sexual violence
  • undergraduates

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