Racial diversity and inclusive representation in urban public child welfare

Catherine K. Lawrence, Wendy Zeitlin, Sreyashi Chakravarty, Angela DeCristofano, Salvador Armendariz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study explores racial diversity and inclusive representation in child welfare organizations, including demographic differences between White workers (WW) and workers of Color (WOC), representation of WOC across all levels of the agency, and influence of racial identity on intentions to remain employed. WW and WOC have many demographic and perceptual similarities regarding their work, yet WOC were significantly more likely to be in caseworker positions, and WW were more likely to be supervisors and managers (p =.015). At the same time, WOC significantly lower burnout scores suggest they are more resilient, although less likely to intend to stay.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Public Child Welfare
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Child Welfare
child welfare
Color
worker
Demography
welfare organization
Organizations
burnout
manager

Keywords

  • Racial diversity and inclusion
  • recruitment retention and promotion
  • workforce development

Cite this

Lawrence, Catherine K. ; Zeitlin, Wendy ; Chakravarty, Sreyashi ; DeCristofano, Angela ; Armendariz, Salvador. / Racial diversity and inclusive representation in urban public child welfare. In: Journal of Public Child Welfare. 2019.
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Racial diversity and inclusive representation in urban public child welfare. / Lawrence, Catherine K.; Zeitlin, Wendy; Chakravarty, Sreyashi; DeCristofano, Angela; Armendariz, Salvador.

In: Journal of Public Child Welfare, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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