Racial/Ethnic Differences in Emotional Health

A Longitudinal Study of Immigrants’ Adolescent Children

Celia C. Lo, Laura M. Hopson, Gaynell M. Simpson, Tyrone Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

First, discrimination was conceptualized as a major source of stress for immigrants’ adolescent children. Next, such children’s emotional health (indicated by measures of self-esteem and depression) was examined for possible associations with discrimination, psychosocial supports, and social structure; additionally, race/ethnicity’s possible moderating role in such associations was evaluated. Data from the first 2 waves of the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (1991–2006) were employed, focusing on 3 groups: Asians, Hispanics, and Whites. Linear regression analyses were used to weigh how discrimination, psychosocial supports, and social structure measured at Wave 1 and Wave 2 related to self-esteem and depression measured at Wave 2. Asians exhibited the highest level of depression and were most likely to perceive discrimination; Asians’ self-esteem was also low, compared to other groups’. Discrimination and psychosocial supports appeared to operate differentially in explaining the 3 groups’ emotional health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-101
Number of pages10
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2017

Fingerprint

Self Concept
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
psychosocial care
discrimination
immigrant
Depression
adolescent
Health
self-esteem
health
social structure
Hispanic Americans
Linear Models
Regression Analysis
Group
regression

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Discrimination
  • Emotional health
  • Ethnic identity
  • Immigrant children

Cite this

Lo, Celia C. ; Hopson, Laura M. ; Simpson, Gaynell M. ; Cheng, Tyrone. / Racial/Ethnic Differences in Emotional Health : A Longitudinal Study of Immigrants’ Adolescent Children. In: Community Mental Health Journal. 2017 ; Vol. 53, No. 1. pp. 92-101.
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Racial/Ethnic Differences in Emotional Health : A Longitudinal Study of Immigrants’ Adolescent Children. / Lo, Celia C.; Hopson, Laura M.; Simpson, Gaynell M.; Cheng, Tyrone.

In: Community Mental Health Journal, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 92-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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