Recognizing and supporting perseverance in mathematical problem-solving via conceptual thinking scaffolds

Joseph DiNapoli, Emily K. Miller

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Perseverance, or initiating and sustaining productive struggle in the face of obstacles, is integral for the learning of mathematics. Yet, the nature of such struggle is uncomfortable in the moment and often avoided for some students. This study aims to interrogate the phenomenon of learning through a lens of perseverance by investigating the effect of scaffolding mathematics tasks on students’ perseverance process during problem-solving. The findings illustrate that prompting students to conceptualize a mathematical situation prior to problem-solving can encourage re-initiating and re-sustaining mathematically productive effort upon reaching a perceived impasse, despite reported discomfort. These results suggest specific methods by which in-the-moment perseverance, and thus learning mathematics with understanding, can be supported.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences
Subtitle of host publicationThe Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020 - Conference Proceedings
EditorsMelissa Gresalfi, Ilana Seidel Horn
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages11-18
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781732467255
StatePublished - 2020
Event14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020 - Nashville, United States
Duration: 19 Jun 202023 Jun 2020

Publication series

NameComputer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1573-4552

Conference

Conference14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020
CountryUnited States
CityNashville
Period19/06/2023/06/20

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