Relations between causal attributions for stuttering and psychological well-being in adults who stutter

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Abstract

Purpose: This study attempted to understand the relationship between causal attributions for stuttering and psychological well-being in adults who stutter. Method: The study employed a cross-sectional design using a web survey distribution mode to gain information related to causal attributions and psychological well-being of 348 adults who stutter. Correlation analyses were conducted to determine relationships between participants' causal attributions (i.e. locus of causality, external control, personal control, stability, biological attributions, non-biological attributions) for stuttering and various measures of psychological well-being including self-stigma, self-esteem/self-efficacy, hope, anxiety and depression. Result: Results indicated that higher perceptions of external control of stuttering were related to significantly lower ratings of hope and self-esteem/self-efficacy and higher ratings of anxiety and depression. Higher perceptions of personal control of stuttering were related to significantly lower ratings of self-stigma and higher ratings of hope and self-esteem/self-efficacy. Increased biological attributions were significantly related to higher ratings of permanency and unchangeableness of stuttering and lower ratings of personal control of stuttering. Conclusion: The findings demonstrate the importance of instilling a sense of control in PWS regarding their ability to manage their stuttering. Findings also raise questions regarding the benefits of educating PWS about the biological underpinnings of stuttering.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Jan 2016

Keywords

  • Stuttering
  • dysfluency
  • psychosocial

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