Revisiting the Picture-Superiority Effect in Symbolic Comparisons: Do Pictures Provide Privileged Access?

Paul C. Amrhein, Mark A. McDaniel, Paula Waddill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 4 experiments, symbolic comparisons were investigated to test semantic-memory retrieval accounts espousing processing advantages for picture over word stimuli. In Experiment 1, participants judged pairs of animal names or pictures by responding to questions probing concrete or abstract attributes (texture or size, ferocity or intelligence). Per pair, attributes were salient or nonsalient concerning their prerated relevance to animals being compared. Distance (near or far) between attribute magnitudes was also varied. Pictures did not significantly speed responding relative to words across all other variables. Advantages were found for far attribute magnitudes (i.e., the distance effect) and salient attributes. The distance effect was much less for salient than nonsalient concrete-attribute comparisons. These results were consistently found in additional experiments with increased statistical power to detect modality effects. Our findings argue against dual-coding and some common-code accounts of conceptual attribute processing, urging reexamination of the assumption that pictures confer privileged access to long-term knowledge.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)843-857
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002

Fingerprint

Intelligence
Semantics
Names
experiment
animal
coding
intelligence
stimulus
semantics
Superiority
Experiment
Salient
Modality Effect
Animals
Stimulus
Semantic Memory
Memory Retrieval
Dual Coding
Texture
Animal Names

Cite this

@article{d2e4aadd335e40bb982e3c80b36d9720,
title = "Revisiting the Picture-Superiority Effect in Symbolic Comparisons: Do Pictures Provide Privileged Access?",
abstract = "In 4 experiments, symbolic comparisons were investigated to test semantic-memory retrieval accounts espousing processing advantages for picture over word stimuli. In Experiment 1, participants judged pairs of animal names or pictures by responding to questions probing concrete or abstract attributes (texture or size, ferocity or intelligence). Per pair, attributes were salient or nonsalient concerning their prerated relevance to animals being compared. Distance (near or far) between attribute magnitudes was also varied. Pictures did not significantly speed responding relative to words across all other variables. Advantages were found for far attribute magnitudes (i.e., the distance effect) and salient attributes. The distance effect was much less for salient than nonsalient concrete-attribute comparisons. These results were consistently found in additional experiments with increased statistical power to detect modality effects. Our findings argue against dual-coding and some common-code accounts of conceptual attribute processing, urging reexamination of the assumption that pictures confer privileged access to long-term knowledge.",
author = "Amrhein, {Paul C.} and McDaniel, {Mark A.} and Paula Waddill",
year = "2002",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1037/0278-7393.28.5.843",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "843--857",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition",
issn = "0278-7393",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "5",

}

Revisiting the Picture-Superiority Effect in Symbolic Comparisons : Do Pictures Provide Privileged Access? / Amrhein, Paul C.; McDaniel, Mark A.; Waddill, Paula.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition, Vol. 28, No. 5, 09.2002, p. 843-857.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Revisiting the Picture-Superiority Effect in Symbolic Comparisons

T2 - Do Pictures Provide Privileged Access?

AU - Amrhein, Paul C.

AU - McDaniel, Mark A.

AU - Waddill, Paula

PY - 2002/9

Y1 - 2002/9

N2 - In 4 experiments, symbolic comparisons were investigated to test semantic-memory retrieval accounts espousing processing advantages for picture over word stimuli. In Experiment 1, participants judged pairs of animal names or pictures by responding to questions probing concrete or abstract attributes (texture or size, ferocity or intelligence). Per pair, attributes were salient or nonsalient concerning their prerated relevance to animals being compared. Distance (near or far) between attribute magnitudes was also varied. Pictures did not significantly speed responding relative to words across all other variables. Advantages were found for far attribute magnitudes (i.e., the distance effect) and salient attributes. The distance effect was much less for salient than nonsalient concrete-attribute comparisons. These results were consistently found in additional experiments with increased statistical power to detect modality effects. Our findings argue against dual-coding and some common-code accounts of conceptual attribute processing, urging reexamination of the assumption that pictures confer privileged access to long-term knowledge.

AB - In 4 experiments, symbolic comparisons were investigated to test semantic-memory retrieval accounts espousing processing advantages for picture over word stimuli. In Experiment 1, participants judged pairs of animal names or pictures by responding to questions probing concrete or abstract attributes (texture or size, ferocity or intelligence). Per pair, attributes were salient or nonsalient concerning their prerated relevance to animals being compared. Distance (near or far) between attribute magnitudes was also varied. Pictures did not significantly speed responding relative to words across all other variables. Advantages were found for far attribute magnitudes (i.e., the distance effect) and salient attributes. The distance effect was much less for salient than nonsalient concrete-attribute comparisons. These results were consistently found in additional experiments with increased statistical power to detect modality effects. Our findings argue against dual-coding and some common-code accounts of conceptual attribute processing, urging reexamination of the assumption that pictures confer privileged access to long-term knowledge.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036730949&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/0278-7393.28.5.843

DO - 10.1037/0278-7393.28.5.843

M3 - Article

C2 - 12219794

AN - SCOPUS:0036730949

VL - 28

SP - 843

EP - 857

JO - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition

JF - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition

SN - 0278-7393

IS - 5

ER -