Scaling a motor skill through observation and practice

Spencer J. Hayes, Nicola J. Hodges, Mark A. Scott, Robert Horn, A. Mark Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examined the proposal that a motor skill is scaled through physical practice and not through observation of a model. In 4 groups, participants (N = 32) did or did not imitate a model bowling a ball to a target 8 m away. In an assessment phase, those groups did or did not observe the same model bowling a ball to a target 4 m away. Participants who viewed a model in the assessment phase were more accurate and consistent in terms of bowling accuracy than were those who did not. Their shoulder and wrist velocity profiles were more similar to those of the 4-m model than were those of the no-model group. Participants who had previous practice and viewed a demonstration were more accurate at scaling the wrist of the bowling arm. Observing a demonstration facilitates the acquisition of control-related features of a movement. Furthermore, early acquisition of coordination aids the use of velocity information for scaling the endpoint of the primary effector.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-366
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Motor Behavior
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2006

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Motor Skills
Wrist
Observation
Arm

Keywords

  • Imitation
  • Kinematic information
  • Perception

Cite this

Hayes, S. J., Hodges, N. J., Scott, M. A., Horn, R., & Williams, A. M. (2006). Scaling a motor skill through observation and practice. Journal of Motor Behavior, 38(5), 357-366. https://doi.org/10.3200/JMBR.38.5.357-366
Hayes, Spencer J. ; Hodges, Nicola J. ; Scott, Mark A. ; Horn, Robert ; Williams, A. Mark. / Scaling a motor skill through observation and practice. In: Journal of Motor Behavior. 2006 ; Vol. 38, No. 5. pp. 357-366.
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Hayes, SJ, Hodges, NJ, Scott, MA, Horn, R & Williams, AM 2006, 'Scaling a motor skill through observation and practice', Journal of Motor Behavior, vol. 38, no. 5, pp. 357-366. https://doi.org/10.3200/JMBR.38.5.357-366

Scaling a motor skill through observation and practice. / Hayes, Spencer J.; Hodges, Nicola J.; Scott, Mark A.; Horn, Robert; Williams, A. Mark.

In: Journal of Motor Behavior, Vol. 38, No. 5, 01.09.2006, p. 357-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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