School-based treatment for children and adolescents with social anxiety disorder

Samantha Coyle, Farah Mahmud, Cody Weeks, Carrie Masia Warner

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is highly prevalent and impairing in adolescents. Research has demonstrated that adolescents with social anxiety show deficits in social skills, which contribute to difficulty with interpersonal relationships and peer victimization. They also often avoid social situations, many of which take place at school, thus limiting their social skill development and creating a cycle of anxiety and avoidance. Thus, it is essential for interventions for social anxiety to target social skills enhancement and discourage social avoidance. SASS is a group-based, cognitive-behavioral intervention that emphasizes social skills training and exposures to overcome social fears. It was designed for delivery by school counselors in schools. Controlled clinical trials have documented the effectiveness of SASS for decreasing social anxiety and improving interpersonal functioning. There is great promise in extending SASS across multitiered systems of supports (MTSS) as well as in using technology to increase the ease of SASS delivery and school counselor training. Further research should be conducted to broaden SASS usability across adolescent populations of diverse cultural, racial, and socioeconomic backgrounds.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSocial Skills Across the Life Span
Subtitle of host publicationTheory, Assessment, and Intervention
PublisherElsevier
Pages237-254
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9780128177525
ISBN (Print)9780128177532
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Exposure
  • Intervention
  • Multitiered systems of supports (MTSS)
  • School-based
  • Social anxiety disorder (SAD)
  • Social skills

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