School engagement among Latino youth in an urban middle school context

Valuing the role of social support

Pauline Garcia-Reid, Robert Reid, N. Andrew Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The education of many Latino youth residing in urban communities is often hindered by fear of crime and violence occurring in places where they live and attend school. Addressing these concerns, this study tested a path model predicting school engagement that included neighborhood and school environment variables (e.g., neighborhood youth behavior, neighborhood safety, and school safety) and social support variables (e.g., teacher support, friend support, parent support, and neighbor support). A total of 226 Latino youth from an urban middle school in the northeastern United States participated in the study. The hypothesized model was found to fit data from the sample and showed direct effects of teacher support, friend support, and parent support on school engagement. In addition, neighborhood youth behavior and neighborhood safety influenced school engagement indirectly through its effect on social support variables. Implications for school-based interventions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-275
Number of pages19
JournalEducation and Urban Society
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2005

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social support
school
parents
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safety
teacher
youth
offense
crime
violence
anxiety
education
community

Keywords

  • Latino youth
  • School engagement
  • Social support

Cite this

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School engagement among Latino youth in an urban middle school context : Valuing the role of social support. / Garcia-Reid, Pauline; Reid, Robert; Andrew Peterson, N.

In: Education and Urban Society, Vol. 37, No. 3, 01.05.2005, p. 257-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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