Selection interviews of overweight job applicants

Can structure reduce the bias?

Eugene J. Kutcher, Jennifer Bragger

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of these studies was to extend the benefits of the structured selection interview beyond its psychometric advantages, and to include its potential to mitigate biases against overweight applicants. In the first study, 133 participants witnessed a videotaped interview and were asked to rate the performance of the candidate. Videotapes varied by structured/unstructured interview scripts and average weight/overweight job applicant. Results confirmed the discrimination bias against overweight interviewees, and supported the possibility that a structured interview moderates this bias. In the second study, 137 participants completed the same task with an additional level of interview structure. Results provided additional support for the predictive power of the highly structured interview, and mixed results for a mildly structured interview.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1993-2022
Number of pages30
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume34
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2004

Fingerprint

Interviews
Videotape Recording
Psychometrics
Weights and Measures

Cite this

@article{2f30112d641b4ea28541868dd9fac82f,
title = "Selection interviews of overweight job applicants: Can structure reduce the bias?",
abstract = "The purpose of these studies was to extend the benefits of the structured selection interview beyond its psychometric advantages, and to include its potential to mitigate biases against overweight applicants. In the first study, 133 participants witnessed a videotaped interview and were asked to rate the performance of the candidate. Videotapes varied by structured/unstructured interview scripts and average weight/overweight job applicant. Results confirmed the discrimination bias against overweight interviewees, and supported the possibility that a structured interview moderates this bias. In the second study, 137 participants completed the same task with an additional level of interview structure. Results provided additional support for the predictive power of the highly structured interview, and mixed results for a mildly structured interview.",
author = "Kutcher, {Eugene J.} and Jennifer Bragger",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1559-1816.2004.tb02688.x",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "1993--2022",
journal = "Journal of Applied Social Psychology",
issn = "0021-9029",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "10",

}

Selection interviews of overweight job applicants : Can structure reduce the bias? / Kutcher, Eugene J.; Bragger, Jennifer.

In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Vol. 34, No. 10, 01.01.2004, p. 1993-2022.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Selection interviews of overweight job applicants

T2 - Can structure reduce the bias?

AU - Kutcher, Eugene J.

AU - Bragger, Jennifer

PY - 2004/1/1

Y1 - 2004/1/1

N2 - The purpose of these studies was to extend the benefits of the structured selection interview beyond its psychometric advantages, and to include its potential to mitigate biases against overweight applicants. In the first study, 133 participants witnessed a videotaped interview and were asked to rate the performance of the candidate. Videotapes varied by structured/unstructured interview scripts and average weight/overweight job applicant. Results confirmed the discrimination bias against overweight interviewees, and supported the possibility that a structured interview moderates this bias. In the second study, 137 participants completed the same task with an additional level of interview structure. Results provided additional support for the predictive power of the highly structured interview, and mixed results for a mildly structured interview.

AB - The purpose of these studies was to extend the benefits of the structured selection interview beyond its psychometric advantages, and to include its potential to mitigate biases against overweight applicants. In the first study, 133 participants witnessed a videotaped interview and were asked to rate the performance of the candidate. Videotapes varied by structured/unstructured interview scripts and average weight/overweight job applicant. Results confirmed the discrimination bias against overweight interviewees, and supported the possibility that a structured interview moderates this bias. In the second study, 137 participants completed the same task with an additional level of interview structure. Results provided additional support for the predictive power of the highly structured interview, and mixed results for a mildly structured interview.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=13544272844&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1559-1816.2004.tb02688.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1559-1816.2004.tb02688.x

M3 - Review article

VL - 34

SP - 1993

EP - 2022

JO - Journal of Applied Social Psychology

JF - Journal of Applied Social Psychology

SN - 0021-9029

IS - 10

ER -