Self-face identification is increased with left hand responses

Julian Keenan, Giorgio Ganis, Stefanie Freund, Alvaro Pascual-Leone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence suggests that autobiographical memory, self-related semantic category judgements, and self-identification tasks may be lateralised, with preferential activity in the right anterior temporal and prefrontal cortex. To test this hypothesis, participants (N = 10) were presented with morphed images of themselves (self) combined with a famous face. A further set of images was generated in which the face of one of the participant's co-workers (familiar) was combined with a famous face. When compared to morphed images composed of a familiar face, the participants identified images less often as being famous if the images were composed of self, but only when responding with their left hands. This greater 'self-effect' found in left-hand responses may imply that when the right hemisphere is preferentially active, participants have a tendency to refer images to self. These data provide further support for a preferential role of the right hemisphere in processing self-related material.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-268
Number of pages10
JournalLaterality
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 7 Aug 2000

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Hand
Episodic Memory
Temporal Lobe
Prefrontal Cortex
Semantics

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Keenan, Julian ; Ganis, Giorgio ; Freund, Stefanie ; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro. / Self-face identification is increased with left hand responses. In: Laterality. 2000 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 259-268.
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Keenan, J, Ganis, G, Freund, S & Pascual-Leone, A 2000, 'Self-face identification is increased with left hand responses', Laterality, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 259-268. https://doi.org/10.1080/135765000406102

Self-face identification is increased with left hand responses. / Keenan, Julian; Ganis, Giorgio; Freund, Stefanie; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro.

In: Laterality, Vol. 5, No. 3, 07.08.2000, p. 259-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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