Self-face processing in a callosotomy patient

Julian Keenan, Mark Wheeler, Steven M. Platek, Gina Lardi, Maryse Lassonde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-face recognition is reserved for humans, apes and possibly dolphins and is thought to be a marker of self-awareness. Previous data have indicated that self-face recognition may be mediated via frontal right hemisphere circuits within the brain. Testing patient M.L., who underwent a total callosotomy, we found that when searching for the self-face in a series of morphs (composite facial images made up of his own and a famous face in inversely varying percentages) the patient made (i) more true-positive and (ii) fewer false-positive responses when responding with the right hemisphere (i.e. indicating with the left hand). There was no hand difference when searching for familiar faces. These data imply a right hemisphere processing advantage for self-faces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2391-2395
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Neuroscience
Volume18
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2003

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Hand
Dolphins
Hominidae
Brain
Facial Recognition

Keywords

  • Callosotomy
  • Face-recognition
  • Laterally
  • Self-awareness
  • Split-brain

Cite this

Keenan, Julian ; Wheeler, Mark ; Platek, Steven M. ; Lardi, Gina ; Lassonde, Maryse. / Self-face processing in a callosotomy patient. In: European Journal of Neuroscience. 2003 ; Vol. 18, No. 8. pp. 2391-2395.
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Keenan, J, Wheeler, M, Platek, SM, Lardi, G & Lassonde, M 2003, 'Self-face processing in a callosotomy patient', European Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 18, no. 8, pp. 2391-2395. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1460-9568.2003.02958.x

Self-face processing in a callosotomy patient. / Keenan, Julian; Wheeler, Mark; Platek, Steven M.; Lardi, Gina; Lassonde, Maryse.

In: European Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 18, No. 8, 01.01.2003, p. 2391-2395.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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