Serotonergic Regulation of Prefrontal Cortical Circuitries Involved in Cognitive Processing: A Review of Individual 5-HT Receptor Mechanisms and Concerted Effects of 5-HT Receptors Exemplified by the Multimodal Antidepressant Vortioxetine

Steven C. Leiser, Yan Li, Alan Pehrson, Elena Dale, Gennady Smagin, Connie Sanchez

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been known for several decades that serotonergic neurotransmission is a key regulator of cognitive function, mood, and sleep. Yet with the relatively recent discoveries of novel serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes, as well as an expanding knowledge of their expression level in certain brain regions and localization on certain cell types, their involvement in cognitive processes is still emerging. Of particular interest are cognitive processes impacted in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critical to normal cognitive processes, including attention, impulsivity, planning, decision-making, working memory, and learning or recall of learned memories. Furthermore, serotonergic dysregulation within the PFC is implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders associated with prominent symptoms of cognitive dysfunction. Thus, it is important to better understand the overall makeup of serotonergic receptors in the PFC and on which cell types these receptors mediate their actions. In this Review, we focus on 5-HT receptor expression patterns within the PFC and how they influence cognitive behavior and neurotransmission. We further discuss the net effects of vortioxetine, an antidepressant acting through multiple serotonergic targets given the recent findings that vortioxetine improves cognition by modulating multiple neurotransmitter systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)970-986
Number of pages17
JournalACS Chemical Neuroscience
Volume6
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Jul 2015

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Serotonin Receptors
Prefrontal Cortex
Antidepressive Agents
Data storage equipment
Processing
Synaptic Transmission
Cognition
Neurotransmitter Agents
Brain
Serotonin
Decision making
Planning
Impulsive Behavior
Short-Term Memory
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Decision Making
Sleep
Learning
vortioxetine

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Cortical microcircuits
  • Frontal cortex
  • Nneurochemistry
  • Receptor expression
  • Serotonin

Cite this

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