Sexuality Information Needs of Latino and African American Ninth Graders: A Content Analysis of Anonymous Questions

Francisca Angulo-Olaiz, Eva S. Goldfarb, Norman A. Constantine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study used qualitative content analysis to examine anonymous questions about sex and sexuality submitted by Latino and African American adolescents in Los Angeles, California, classrooms. The majority of questions asked about sexuality and sexual behavior, or anatomy and physiology, with fewer questions about pregnancy and pregnancy prevention, sexually transmitted infections, and condoms. Overall, a notable mix was found of questions implying exposure to or awareness of a wide range of sexual activities, together with questions demonstrating fundamental misunderstandings or confusion about some of the most basic aspects of sex and sexuality. Gender differences emerged across topics, subtopics, and question types. The results of this study suggest that differences exist between what Latino and African-American teens yearn to know about sex and sexuality, and what information they are getting on these topics from other sources. This reinforces the importance of considering the concerns and needs of the intended audience in designing and evaluating health education programs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-40
Number of pages20
JournalAmerican Journal of Sexuality Education
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014

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sexuality
content analysis
pregnancy
physiology
health promotion
gender-specific factors
adolescent
classroom
American

Keywords

  • Sexuality education
  • adolescent sexuality
  • gender
  • sexual behavior
  • sexual health

Cite this

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Sexuality Information Needs of Latino and African American Ninth Graders : A Content Analysis of Anonymous Questions. / Angulo-Olaiz, Francisca; Goldfarb, Eva S.; Constantine, Norman A.

In: American Journal of Sexuality Education, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 21-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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