Social performance–based interventions promote gains in social knowledge in the absence of explicit training for youth with autism spectrum disorder

Bianca M. Marro, Erin Kang, Kathryn M. Hauschild, Karys M. Normansell, Tamara M. Abu-Ramadan, Matthew D. Lerner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience deficits in social knowledge. It has long been theorized that these youth must learn these skills explicitly, and social skills interventions (SSIs) have followed suit. Recently, performance-based SSIs have emerged, which promote in vivo opportunities for social engagement without explicit instruction. Effects of performance-based SSIs on social knowledge have not been examined. This study employs two discrete samples (one lab-based, one community-based) of youth with ASD to examine the effects of performance-based interventions on social knowledge. Results largely support the efficacy and effectiveness of improving social knowledge by performance-based interventions without explicit teaching. This indicates that youth with ASD may be able to learn these aspects of social cognition implicitly, rather than exclusively explicitly. The results of the current study also suggest that SSI content, dosage, and intensity may relate to these outcomes, which are important considerations in clinical practice and future studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-325
Number of pages25
JournalBulletin of the Menninger Clinic
Volume83
Issue numberSpecialissue3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

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