Social Status, Discrimination, and Minority Individuals’ Mental Health: a Secondary Analysis of US National Surveys

Celia C. Lo, Tyrone Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Our study measured minority individuals’ social status factors and frequency of discrimination experiences, in order to delineate social mechanisms linking race/ethnicity to mental status (specifically, to current mood/anxiety disorder and self-rated mental health). Methods: In this nationally representative secondary research, our data analyses drew on the cross-sectional “Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys,” dating 2001–2003. The sample for the final model numbered 9368 respondents (2016 Asians, 2676 Latinos, 4676 blacks). Results: Across races/ethnicities, better mental health was associated with male gender, higher income, marriage, more education, and less-frequent discrimination experiences; discrimination experiences could impair health, especially among blacks. Marriage’s strong contribution to Asians’ mental health did not hold among blacks; education’s contribution to Latinos’ mental health did not hold among blacks either. Blacks’ mental health was unaffected by immigration status, but Asian and Latino immigrants showed less-robust mental health than native-born counterparts. Conclusions: Across the three racial/ethnic groups studied, differences were noted in relationships between self-reported mental health status and the employed social status and discrimination factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)485-494
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

secondary analysis
social status
Mental Health
discrimination
mental health
minority
Hispanic Americans
Marriage
ethnicity
marriage
social discrimination
Education
experience
Emigration and Immigration
epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Anxiety Disorders
Mood Disorders
Population Groups
Ethnic Groups

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • Mental health
  • National survey
  • Racial/ethnic minority groups
  • Social status

Cite this

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Social Status, Discrimination, and Minority Individuals’ Mental Health : a Secondary Analysis of US National Surveys. / Lo, Celia C.; Cheng, Tyrone.

In: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, Vol. 5, No. 3, 01.06.2018, p. 485-494.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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