Sociopolitical control as a mediator between ethnic identity and social support on 30-day drug use among black girls

Ijeoma Opara, Ashley V. Hill, Amanda Calhoun, Marline Francois, Courtnae Alves, Pauline Garcia-Reid, Robert J. Reid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While Black girls have lower rates of drug use, they face worse health and wellbeing consequences associated with drug use. Understanding which strengths-based factors serve as buffers to limit adverse outcomes related to drug use among Black girls is essential for prevention. This study investigated the mediating role of sociopolitical control on drug use among Black girls (n = 340). Using path analysis, models were tested to include the variables of interest. Sociopolitical control (e.g. leadership competency and policy control) significantly mediated the relationship between ethnic identity and social support on drug use. Implications from this study may consider bolstering empowerment-based strategies in drug use prevention for Black girls.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Black girls
  • drug use
  • empowerment
  • ethnic identity
  • sociopolitical control

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