Spatial and temporal patterns of ocean acidification during the end-permian mass extinction-an earth system model evaluation

Ying Cui, Lee R. Kump, Andy Ridgwell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The end-Permian extinction was a geologically abrupt (~ 100 000-year duration) event that occurred ~ 252 million years ago (Ma) (Burgess et al., 2014; Joachimski et al., 2012; Shen et al., 2011; Sun et al., 2012). The main phase of the extinction event was characterized by 8 to 10 _C of global warming (Joachimski et al., 2012), driven by the massive release of greenhouse gases, as reflected in a contemporaneous negative C isotope excursion (CIE) of ~ 6‰ (Shen et al., 2011) in the ocean. This suggests that either the source or its oxidation product was CO2. Recent analyses of calcium isotopes of marine sediments and the pattern of extinction selectivity (Clapham and Payne, 2011; Hinojosa et al., 2012; Payne et al., 2010), and volatile studies on melt inclusions from the Siberian Traps (Black et al., 2012; Black et al., 2014), suggest that the Siberian Traps volcanism might be the trigger for the end-Permian extinction. Besides global warming, one other consequence of CO2 emission is ocean acidification, known as “the other CO2 problem” (Doney et al., 2009). Rising atmospheric CO2 causes a decrease in ocean pH and adjustments in carbonate chemistry, leading to a reduction in carbonate ion concentration and the saturation state of calcite and aragonite (Zeebe, 2012). In addition to impacts on their physiology, calcifying organisms are also susceptible to dissolution of their carbonate skeletons (Kleypas et al., 2006; Turley et al., 2010).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationVolcanism and Global Environmental Change
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages291-307
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9781107415683
ISBN (Print)9781107058378
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2015

Fingerprint

mass extinction
Permian
extinction
carbonate
global warming
isotope
melt inclusion
ocean
aragonite
skeleton
marine sediment
physiology
volcanism
greenhouse gas
calcite
calcium
dissolution
saturation
oxidation
ocean acidification

Cite this

Cui, Y., Kump, L. R., & Ridgwell, A. (2015). Spatial and temporal patterns of ocean acidification during the end-permian mass extinction-an earth system model evaluation. In Volcanism and Global Environmental Change (pp. 291-307). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/9781107415683.020
Cui, Ying ; Kump, Lee R. ; Ridgwell, Andy. / Spatial and temporal patterns of ocean acidification during the end-permian mass extinction-an earth system model evaluation. Volcanism and Global Environmental Change. Cambridge University Press, 2015. pp. 291-307
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Cui, Y, Kump, LR & Ridgwell, A 2015, Spatial and temporal patterns of ocean acidification during the end-permian mass extinction-an earth system model evaluation. in Volcanism and Global Environmental Change. Cambridge University Press, pp. 291-307. https://doi.org/10.1007/9781107415683.020

Spatial and temporal patterns of ocean acidification during the end-permian mass extinction-an earth system model evaluation. / Cui, Ying; Kump, Lee R.; Ridgwell, Andy.

Volcanism and Global Environmental Change. Cambridge University Press, 2015. p. 291-307.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Cui Y, Kump LR, Ridgwell A. Spatial and temporal patterns of ocean acidification during the end-permian mass extinction-an earth system model evaluation. In Volcanism and Global Environmental Change. Cambridge University Press. 2015. p. 291-307 https://doi.org/10.1007/9781107415683.020