Suicide preventionwith adolescents suicide prevention with adolescents. Considering potential benefits and untoward effects of public service announcements

Bonnie Klimes-Dougan, Chih-Yuan, Chih-Yuan Lee, Alaa K. Houri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aims: Suicide is one of the most serious public health challenges; yet determining optimal methods for preventing suicide in adolescents continues to be an elusive goal. The aim of this study was to investigate possible benefits and untoward effects of suicide-prevention public service announcements (PSAs) for adolescents. Methods: Adolescent participants (N = 426; 56% female) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (a) a billboard simulation, (b) a 30-s TV ad simulation, and (c) a no-information condition. Results: The results of this study suggest some benefits for the information conveyed by the TV ad (e.g., more knowledgeable about depression). Few benefits were noted for adolescents who were exposed to billboard simulation, and the results raised substantial concerns about possible untoward effects, particularly in adolescents who were exhibiting depressive or suicidal symptoms. Billboard viewers were less likely to favor help-seeking attitudes, perceived PSAs as being less useful, and endorsed moremaladaptive coping. Conclusions: More research is urgently needed so that well-intended efforts to prevent suicide can more optimally serve the desired goals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-135
Number of pages8
JournalCrisis
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2009

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Suicide
Public Health
Public Service Announcements
Depression
Research

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Iatrogenic
  • PSA
  • Suicide prevention
  • Universal prevention

Cite this

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title = "Suicide preventionwith adolescents suicide prevention with adolescents. Considering potential benefits and untoward effects of public service announcements",
abstract = "Background/Aims: Suicide is one of the most serious public health challenges; yet determining optimal methods for preventing suicide in adolescents continues to be an elusive goal. The aim of this study was to investigate possible benefits and untoward effects of suicide-prevention public service announcements (PSAs) for adolescents. Methods: Adolescent participants (N = 426; 56{\%} female) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (a) a billboard simulation, (b) a 30-s TV ad simulation, and (c) a no-information condition. Results: The results of this study suggest some benefits for the information conveyed by the TV ad (e.g., more knowledgeable about depression). Few benefits were noted for adolescents who were exposed to billboard simulation, and the results raised substantial concerns about possible untoward effects, particularly in adolescents who were exhibiting depressive or suicidal symptoms. Billboard viewers were less likely to favor help-seeking attitudes, perceived PSAs as being less useful, and endorsed moremaladaptive coping. Conclusions: More research is urgently needed so that well-intended efforts to prevent suicide can more optimally serve the desired goals.",
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Suicide preventionwith adolescents suicide prevention with adolescents. Considering potential benefits and untoward effects of public service announcements. / Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Chih-Yuan, ; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Houri, Alaa K.

In: Crisis, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.12.2009, p. 128-135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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