Superior visual search accuracy after exposure to natural relative to urban environments

Joshua Sandry, Jeremy Schwark, Gayle Hunt, Kasha Geels, Stephen Rice

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated a performance benefit when interacting in natural compared to urban environments. Presently, we are interested in testing whether visual search performance would differ depending on environmental exposure. We exposed participants to images of either natural scenes or urban scenes and asked them to complete a visual conjunction search (identifying the letter O embedded in an array of Q's). Consistent with existing literature, findings revealed that participants were more accurate at identifying targets when they were exposed to images of nature relative to participants exposed to images of urban environments.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
Pages1624-1628
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2012
EventProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: 22 Oct 201226 Oct 2012

Other

OtherProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period22/10/1226/10/12

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Cite this

Sandry, J., Schwark, J., Hunt, G., Geels, K., & Rice, S. (2012). Superior visual search accuracy after exposure to natural relative to urban environments. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 (pp. 1624-1628) https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561324
Sandry, Joshua ; Schwark, Jeremy ; Hunt, Gayle ; Geels, Kasha ; Rice, Stephen. / Superior visual search accuracy after exposure to natural relative to urban environments. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. 2012. pp. 1624-1628
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Sandry, J, Schwark, J, Hunt, G, Geels, K & Rice, S 2012, Superior visual search accuracy after exposure to natural relative to urban environments. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. pp. 1624-1628, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012, Boston, MA, United States, 22/10/12. https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561324

Superior visual search accuracy after exposure to natural relative to urban environments. / Sandry, Joshua; Schwark, Jeremy; Hunt, Gayle; Geels, Kasha; Rice, Stephen.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. 2012. p. 1624-1628.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

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Sandry J, Schwark J, Hunt G, Geels K, Rice S. Superior visual search accuracy after exposure to natural relative to urban environments. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. 2012. p. 1624-1628 https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561324