Teaching high-risk clinical competencies

Simulations to protect students and models

Research output: Contribution to journalShort surveyResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It might not be possible to provide all athletic training students with actual injuries during their clinicaleducation on which they can demonstrate a particular skill. If not, the athletic training educator should provide clinical simulations that minimize the risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens for the student and the model. Structured training and practice have been shown to help reduce or prevent the occurrence of needlestick injury and other exposure to blood-borne pathogens. 3,8 We present these simulations to help health-care educators and clinical instructors use readily available materials to provide clinical simulations that are safe for everyone involved. Having a variety of safe alternatives to simulate high-risk clinical skills and competencies helps educators assess learning over time in their students.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-25
Number of pages3
JournalAthletic Therapy Today
Volume10
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2005

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Clinical Competence
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Teaching
Students
Sports
Health Educators
Needlestick Injuries
Learning
Delivery of Health Care
Wounds and Injuries

Cite this

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abstract = "It might not be possible to provide all athletic training students with actual injuries during their clinicaleducation on which they can demonstrate a particular skill. If not, the athletic training educator should provide clinical simulations that minimize the risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens for the student and the model. Structured training and practice have been shown to help reduce or prevent the occurrence of needlestick injury and other exposure to blood-borne pathogens. 3,8 We present these simulations to help health-care educators and clinical instructors use readily available materials to provide clinical simulations that are safe for everyone involved. Having a variety of safe alternatives to simulate high-risk clinical skills and competencies helps educators assess learning over time in their students.",
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Teaching high-risk clinical competencies : Simulations to protect students and models. / Middlemas, David; Grant-Ford, Marsha.

In: Athletic Therapy Today, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 23-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort surveyResearchpeer-review

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