The constitution of bilingual/ESL education as a disciplinary practice

Genealogical explorations

Jaime Grinberg, Elizabeth R. Saavedra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article provides a cultural and political critique of the constitution of bilingual/English-as-a-second-language (ESL) education as a disciplinary practice in the case of New Mexico. Using genealogy and postcolonial, poststructural, and critical frameworks, this article claims that the directions advanced by the Chicano/Chicana movement were lost. Instead, what emerged was a field that nurtured a mix of symbolic colonization and docilization through the construction of a settlement that controls thought and behavior, perpetuating misrecognition in a Bourdieuian sense. Illusion, collusion, and delusion have enabled the dominance of psycholinguistic approaches. Problematizing the constitution of bilingual/ESL education within a cultural and political sphere could foster an emancipatory education for marginalized students.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-441
Number of pages23
JournalReview of Educational Research
Volume70
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2000

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language education
emancipatory education
constitution
delusion
psycholinguistics
colonization
genealogy
Mexico
student

Cite this

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The constitution of bilingual/ESL education as a disciplinary practice : Genealogical explorations. / Grinberg, Jaime; Saavedra, Elizabeth R.

In: Review of Educational Research, Vol. 70, No. 4, 01.01.2000, p. 419-441.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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