The effect of stress on men's food selection

Debra Zellner, Shin Saito, Johanie Gonzalez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigates the effect of stress on food choice among men. Two groups of men were given either solvable (no-stress) or unsolvable (stress) anagrams to solve. Four bowls of snack foods-two healthy (peanuts and grapes) and two unhealthy (potato chips and M&M chocolate candies)-were available and subjects were invited to snack on them. Men in the no-stress group ate significantly more of the unhealthy foods than did men in the stress group. This finding is quite different from that found with women [Zellner et al. (2006). Food selection changes under stress. Physiology & Behavior, 87, 789-793]. Women tended to eat more grapes when not stressed than when stressed and more M&Ms when stressed than when not stressed. Thus, the effect of stress level on food choice is different for men and women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)696-699
Number of pages4
JournalAppetite
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2007

Fingerprint

Food Preferences
Snacks
Vitis
Food
Candy
Solanum tuberosum

Keywords

  • Food choice
  • Stress

Cite this

Zellner, D., Saito, S., & Gonzalez, J. (2007). The effect of stress on men's food selection. Appetite, 49(3), 696-699. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2007.06.013
Zellner, Debra ; Saito, Shin ; Gonzalez, Johanie. / The effect of stress on men's food selection. In: Appetite. 2007 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 696-699.
@article{1bac113146bd4fb49583a11356796175,
title = "The effect of stress on men's food selection",
abstract = "This study investigates the effect of stress on food choice among men. Two groups of men were given either solvable (no-stress) or unsolvable (stress) anagrams to solve. Four bowls of snack foods-two healthy (peanuts and grapes) and two unhealthy (potato chips and M&M chocolate candies)-were available and subjects were invited to snack on them. Men in the no-stress group ate significantly more of the unhealthy foods than did men in the stress group. This finding is quite different from that found with women [Zellner et al. (2006). Food selection changes under stress. Physiology & Behavior, 87, 789-793]. Women tended to eat more grapes when not stressed than when stressed and more M&Ms when stressed than when not stressed. Thus, the effect of stress level on food choice is different for men and women.",
keywords = "Food choice, Stress",
author = "Debra Zellner and Shin Saito and Johanie Gonzalez",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.appet.2007.06.013",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "696--699",
journal = "Appetite",
issn = "0195-6663",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

Zellner, D, Saito, S & Gonzalez, J 2007, 'The effect of stress on men's food selection', Appetite, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 696-699. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2007.06.013

The effect of stress on men's food selection. / Zellner, Debra; Saito, Shin; Gonzalez, Johanie.

In: Appetite, Vol. 49, No. 3, 01.11.2007, p. 696-699.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of stress on men's food selection

AU - Zellner, Debra

AU - Saito, Shin

AU - Gonzalez, Johanie

PY - 2007/11/1

Y1 - 2007/11/1

N2 - This study investigates the effect of stress on food choice among men. Two groups of men were given either solvable (no-stress) or unsolvable (stress) anagrams to solve. Four bowls of snack foods-two healthy (peanuts and grapes) and two unhealthy (potato chips and M&M chocolate candies)-were available and subjects were invited to snack on them. Men in the no-stress group ate significantly more of the unhealthy foods than did men in the stress group. This finding is quite different from that found with women [Zellner et al. (2006). Food selection changes under stress. Physiology & Behavior, 87, 789-793]. Women tended to eat more grapes when not stressed than when stressed and more M&Ms when stressed than when not stressed. Thus, the effect of stress level on food choice is different for men and women.

AB - This study investigates the effect of stress on food choice among men. Two groups of men were given either solvable (no-stress) or unsolvable (stress) anagrams to solve. Four bowls of snack foods-two healthy (peanuts and grapes) and two unhealthy (potato chips and M&M chocolate candies)-were available and subjects were invited to snack on them. Men in the no-stress group ate significantly more of the unhealthy foods than did men in the stress group. This finding is quite different from that found with women [Zellner et al. (2006). Food selection changes under stress. Physiology & Behavior, 87, 789-793]. Women tended to eat more grapes when not stressed than when stressed and more M&Ms when stressed than when not stressed. Thus, the effect of stress level on food choice is different for men and women.

KW - Food choice

KW - Stress

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35649004322&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.appet.2007.06.013

DO - 10.1016/j.appet.2007.06.013

M3 - Article

VL - 49

SP - 696

EP - 699

JO - Appetite

JF - Appetite

SN - 0195-6663

IS - 3

ER -