The enforcement of normalcy in schools and the disablement of families

unpacking master narratives on parental denial

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The notion that some parents may be ‘in denial’ is a pervasive theme in dominant discourses on families of children with disabilities. In this analytic essay, I deconstruct cultural and institutional master narratives on parental denial and discuss their role in the marginalization of students with disabilities in schools. I argue that discourses on parental denial privilege the perspectives of those in positions of power and control, leave the practice of ability-based segregation in schools unexamined, and discredit agency among families. Additionally, drawing from existing narrative-based research, I explore alternative interpretations of parents’ responses to their children’s differences, situating these in the framework of critical disability studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1221-1233
Number of pages13
JournalDisability and Society
Volume29
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014

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parents
disability
disability studies
narrative
discourse
Parents
school
segregation
privilege
Aptitude
Disabled Children
interpretation
ability
Students
student
Research
Denial (Psychology)
Power (Psychology)

Keywords

  • critical disability studies
  • families of children with disabilities
  • inclusive education
  • master narratives
  • parents’ perspectives
  • professional–family partnerships

Cite this

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The enforcement of normalcy in schools and the disablement of families : unpacking master narratives on parental denial. / Lalvani, Priya.

In: Disability and Society, Vol. 29, No. 8, 01.01.2014, p. 1221-1233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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