The gravitational-wave memory effect

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54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The nonlinear memory effect is a slowly growing, non-oscillatory contribution to the gravitational-wave amplitude. It originates from gravitational waves that are sourced by the previously emitted waves. In an ideal gravitational-wave interferometer a gravitational wave with memory causes a permanent displacement of the test masses that persists after the wave has passed. Surprisingly, the nonlinear memory affects the signal amplitude starting at leading (Newtonian-quadrupole) order. Despite this fact, the nonlinear memory is not easily extracted from current numerical relativity simulations. After reviewing the linear and nonlinear memory I summarize some recent work, including (1) computations of the memory contribution to the inspiral waveform amplitude (thus completing the waveform to third post-Newtonian order); (2) the first calculations of the nonlinear memory that include all phases of binary black hole coalescence (inspiral, merger, ringdown); and (3) realistic estimates of the detectability of the memory with LISA.

Original languageEnglish
Article number084036
JournalClassical and Quantum Gravity
Volume27
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 14 Apr 2010

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gravitational waves
waveforms
LISA (observatory)
reviewing
coalescing
relativity
interferometers
quadrupoles
causes
estimates
simulation

Cite this

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The gravitational-wave memory effect. / Favata, Marc.

In: Classical and Quantum Gravity, Vol. 27, No. 8, 084036, 14.04.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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