The impact of perceived privacy breach on sustainability of social networking sites

Stanislav Mamonov, Marios Koufaris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The sustainability of social networking sites is critically dependent on information sharing by site users. However practice suggests that privacy is a major concern which affects users' willingness to share personal information on social networking sites. To understand how privacy expectancies affect sustainability we draw on the psychological contract theory. We develop a framework which posits that privacy-related expectancies are inherent to disclosure of private information. Perceptions of a privacy breach trigger the affective experience of a psychological contract violation and undermine trust, which consequently undermine the sustainability of continued information disclosure. We evaluate the framework by surveying 638 Facebook users. We find that SNS users' perceptions of privacy breach attributed to the SNS provider may cause irreparable harm. The experience of psychological contract violations and loss of trust motivate users to reduce information sharing and consider disengaging from the SNS completely.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 47th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2014
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages1774-1784
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9781479925049
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014
Event47th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2014 - Waikoloa, HI, United States
Duration: 6 Jan 20149 Jan 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
ISSN (Print)1530-1605

Other

Other47th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2014
CountryUnited States
CityWaikoloa, HI
Period6/01/149/01/14

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