The Interaction between cognitive and motivational co-regulated processes on a collaborative task

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Co-regulated learning (CRL) describes the social processes group members employ to regulate their shared work on a joint task. While recent research has certainly added to our understanding of CRL, most studies have focused on either co-regulation of cognitive (e.g., planning, monitoring, evaluation) or motivational (e.g., efficacy, attributions) processes ignoring the interaction between these processes. This study examined cognitive and motivational instances of co-regulation within two, sixth grade collaborative groups (N=8) in order to explain how these processes inter-related and co-occurred. Results of the analysis indicated that agreement and interest led to sustained co-regulation of cognitive processes, while verbal put-downs thwarted it. Understanding how cognitive and motivational processes co-occur and interact not only adds to our understanding of CRL, but can be used in practice to improve how peers interact within collaborative contexts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)463-476
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Learning
Volume18
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2011

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interaction
regulation
joint tasks
learning
social process
group membership
attribution
school grade
monitoring
planning
evaluation
Group

Keywords

  • Co-regulation
  • Collaboration

Cite this

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The Interaction between cognitive and motivational co-regulated processes on a collaborative task. / Barnes, Nicole.

In: International Journal of Learning, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.12.2011, p. 463-476.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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