“The More We Can Try to Open Them Up, the Better It Will Be for Their Integration”: Integration and the Coercive Assimilation of Muslim Youth

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Capitalizing on national anxieties, right wing populist leaders promise to enforce national borders with new constellations of policies that regulate and exclude Muslim bodies. Using the theoretical tool of “technologies of concern” (Jaffe-Walter, 2016), this essay critiques how state security discourses operate through public schools. Drawing on ethnographic research with Muslim youth in a Danish public school and an analysis of European integration policies, the author analyzes how policies and practices that ostensibly support young people’s integration enact everyday violence and coercive assimilation. Highlighting the perspectives of the young people she worked with, the author argues that state efforts to transform Muslim students into acceptable subjects of the nation-state encouraged their alienation and marginalization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-68
Number of pages6
JournalDiaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 Apr 2017

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assimilation
Muslim
integration policy
national border
European integration
alienation
school
nation state
leader
violence
anxiety
discourse
student

Cite this

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