The once and future information society

James B. Rule, Yasemin Besen-Cassino

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the late twentieth century, many social scientists and other social commentators came to characterize the world as evolving into an "information society." Central to these claims was the notion that new social uses of information, and particularly application of scientific knowledge, are transforming social life in fundamental ways. Among the supposed transformations are the rise of intellectuals in social importance, growing productivity and prosperity stemming from increasingly knowledge-based economic activity, and replacement of political conflict by authoritative, knowledge-based decision-making. We trace these ideas to their origins in the Enlightenment doctrines of Saint Simon and Comte, show that empirical support for them has never been strong, and consider the durability of their social appeal.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)317-342
Number of pages26
JournalTheory and Society
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2008

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information society
knowledge
political conflict
prosperity
social scientist
intellectual
doctrine
appeal
twentieth century
productivity
decision making
economics
Information Society
Decision Making
Economic Activity
Rise
Replacement
Scientific Knowledge
Social Life
Prosperity

Cite this

Rule, James B. ; Besen-Cassino, Yasemin. / The once and future information society. In: Theory and Society. 2008 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 317-342.
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The once and future information society. / Rule, James B.; Besen-Cassino, Yasemin.

In: Theory and Society, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.08.2008, p. 317-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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