The Pond You Fish In Determines the Fish You Catch

Exploring Strategies for Qualitative Data Collection

Lisa A. Suzuki, Muninder Ahluwalia, Agnes Kwong Arora, Jacqueline S. Mattis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Qualitative research has increased in popularity among social scientists. While substantial attention has been given to various methods of qualitative analysis, there is a need to focus on strategies for collecting diverse forms of qualitative data. In this article, the authors discuss four sources of qualitative data: participant observation, interviews, physical data, and electronic data. Although counseling psychology researchers often use interviewing, participant observation and physical and electronic data are also beneficial ways of collecting qualitative data that have been underutilized.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-327
Number of pages33
JournalThe Counseling Psychologist
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2007

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Fishes
Observation
Qualitative Research
Information Storage and Retrieval
Counseling
Research Personnel
Interviews
Psychology

Cite this

Suzuki, Lisa A. ; Ahluwalia, Muninder ; Arora, Agnes Kwong ; Mattis, Jacqueline S. / The Pond You Fish In Determines the Fish You Catch : Exploring Strategies for Qualitative Data Collection. In: The Counseling Psychologist. 2007 ; Vol. 35, No. 2. pp. 295-327.
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The Pond You Fish In Determines the Fish You Catch : Exploring Strategies for Qualitative Data Collection. / Suzuki, Lisa A.; Ahluwalia, Muninder; Arora, Agnes Kwong; Mattis, Jacqueline S.

In: The Counseling Psychologist, Vol. 35, No. 2, 01.01.2007, p. 295-327.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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