The psycholegal factors for juvenile transfer and reverse transfer evaluations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

It remains unclear whether forensic mental health assessments for juvenile reverse transfer (to juvenile court) are distinct from those for juvenile transfer (to adult court). This survey consisted of an updated review of transfer and reverse transfer laws (in jurisdictions that have both mechanisms) in light of the generally accepted three-factor model of functional legal capacities involved in transfer evaluations (i.e., risk, sophistication–maturity, and treatment amenability). Results indicated that a majority of states' reverse transfer statutes refer explicitly or implicitly to the same three psycholegal constructs identified as central for transfer. Given the legal similarity between transfer and reverse transfer, potential practice implications and directions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-64
Number of pages19
JournalBehavioral Sciences and the Law
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2018

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Transfer Factor
Mental Health
evaluation
legal capacity
Direction compound
Surveys and Questionnaires
juvenile court
statute
jurisdiction
mental health

Cite this

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The psycholegal factors for juvenile transfer and reverse transfer evaluations. / King, Christopher.

In: Behavioral Sciences and the Law, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 46-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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