The role of immigration status in heavy drinking among Asian Americans

Celia C. Lo, Tyrone Cheng, Rebecca J. Howell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the role of Asian Americans' immigration status in their heavy drinking, using a national sample of 3,574 Asian American adults during 2008 to 2011 when surveyed by the National Health Interview Survey. Our results, with relevant social structural factors controlled, show that U.S.-born Asian Americans exhibited the highest heavy-drinking levels, followed by long-time-resident Asian immigrants, then recent-resident Asian immigrants (our three main subsamples). The higher heavy-drinking levels characterizing U.S.-born Asians who were male and younger, as compared to immigrant Asians who were male and younger, helped explain differential heavy-drinking levels across subsamples. The study's limitations are noted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)932-940
Number of pages9
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume49
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014

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Asian Americans
Emigration and Immigration
Drinking
immigration
immigrant
Health Surveys
resident
Interviews
interview
health

Keywords

  • Heavy drinking
  • Immigration status
  • Long-time-resident Asian immigrants
  • Recent-resident Asian immigrants
  • U.S.-born Asians

Cite this

Lo, Celia C. ; Cheng, Tyrone ; Howell, Rebecca J. / The role of immigration status in heavy drinking among Asian Americans. In: Substance Use and Misuse. 2014 ; Vol. 49, No. 8. pp. 932-940.
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The role of immigration status in heavy drinking among Asian Americans. / Lo, Celia C.; Cheng, Tyrone; Howell, Rebecca J.

In: Substance Use and Misuse, Vol. 49, No. 8, 01.01.2014, p. 932-940.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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