Timing and frequency of sublethal exposure modifies the induction and retention of increased insecticide tolerance in wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus)

Devin K. Jones, Erika K. Yates, Brian M. Mattes, William D. Hintz, Matthew S. Schuler, Rick A. Relyea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although the paradigm for increased tolerance to pesticides has been by selection on constitutive (naïve) traits, recent research has shown it can also occur through phenotypic plasticity. However, the time period in which induction can occur, the duration of induced tolerance, and the influence of multiple induction events remain unknown. We hypothesized that the induction of increased pesticide tolerance is limited to early sensitive periods, the magnitude of induced tolerance depends on the number of exposures, and the retention of induced tolerance depends on the time elapsed after an exposure and the number of exposures. To test these hypotheses, we exposed wood frog tadpoles to either a no-carbaryl control (water) or 0.5 mg/L carbaryl at 4 time periods, and later tested their tolerance to carbaryl using time-to-death assays. We discovered that tadpoles induced increased tolerance early and midway but not late in our experiment and their constitutive tolerance increased with age. We found no difference in the magnitude of induced tolerance after a single or 2 exposures. Finally, induced pesticide tolerance was reversed within 6 d but was retained only when tadpoles experienced all 4 consecutive exposures. Phenotypic plasticity provides an immediate response for sensitive amphibian larvae to early pesticide exposures and reduces phenotypic mismatches in aquatic environments contaminated by agrochemicals. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:2188–2197.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2188-2197
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018

Keywords

  • Carbamate
  • Ecotoxicology
  • Evolution
  • Resistance
  • Trade-off

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Timing and frequency of sublethal exposure modifies the induction and retention of increased insecticide tolerance in wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this