Trajectories of perceived social support among low-income female survivors of Hurricane Katrina

Sarah Lowe, Margaret Willis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore trajectories of perceived social support among low-income women who survived Hurricane Katrina, and were surveyed prior to the hurricane and approximately one and four years thereafter (N = 562). Latent class growth analysis provided evidence of the following four trajectories of perceived support: High Increasing (35.9%), High Decreasing (20.3%), Low Stable (41.1%), and Low Decreasing (2.7%). Bereavement was significantly predictive of membership in the Low Stable trajectory, relative to the High Increasing and High Decreasing trajectories. Higher psychological distress and indicators of greater social network size, density, and closeness were significantly predictive of membership in the Low Decreasing trajectory, relative to the High Increasing and High Decreasing trajectories.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1034-1055
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2015

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Cyclonic Storms
Hurricanes
Social Support
Survivors
social support
low income
Trajectories
Bereavement
social network
Psychology
Growth
evidence

Keywords

  • Hurricane Katrina
  • latent class growth analysis
  • low-income women
  • natural disasters
  • perceived social support
  • psychological distress
  • social networks

Cite this

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Trajectories of perceived social support among low-income female survivors of Hurricane Katrina. / Lowe, Sarah; Willis, Margaret.

In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Vol. 32, No. 8, 01.12.2015, p. 1034-1055.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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