Urban freight mobility. Collection of data on time, costs, and barriers related to moving product into the central business district

Anne G. Morris, Alain L. Kornhauser, Mark Kay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Just-in-time deliveries and lower inventories have led to more frequent deliveries of goods and services, markedly increasing urban congestion. The Goods Movement in the New York Metropolitan Area study's goal was to develop a research methodology for capturing urban freight mobility data and to collect cost and time data on freight moving into New York City's central business district (CBD). The methodology developed and its implementation are discussed. Problems with access and collecting data from industry executives are also addressed. In industry-sector focus groups, senior logistics executives discussed urban freight mobility issues, especially barriers to goods movement into the CBD. Barriers consistently identified in order of greatest frequency of mention from 13 focus groups were congestion, inadequate docking space, inadequate curb space for commercial vehicles, security, and excessive ticketing of high-profile companies. The Freight Mobility Interview form asked logistics/transportation/distribution managers to provide company-specific information about the following categories: transportation services and distribution channels used and related cost, time, and barriers to freight mobility. Analysis of the interview data revealed that major barriers to freight mobility identified by both shippers and carriers were consistent with those cited by focus group participants. The combined qualitative and quantitative data collected identified the processes industry uses to manage urban congestion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-32
Number of pages6
JournalTransportation Research Record
Issue number1613
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1998

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Urban freight mobility. Collection of data on time, costs, and barriers related to moving product into the central business district. / Morris, Anne G.; Kornhauser, Alain L.; Kay, Mark.

In: Transportation Research Record, No. 1613, 01.01.1998, p. 27-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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