Vocal range and intensity in actors

A studio versus stage comparison

Kate A. Emerich, Ingo R. Titze, Jan G. Švec, Peter Popolo, Gary Logan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A voice range profile (VRP) was obtained from each of eight professional actors and compared with two speech range profiles (SRPs). One speech profile was obtained during the dramatic reading of a scene in the laboratory and the other during a performance on stage in a professional theater. The objective was to determine the pitch and loudness ranges used by the actors in speech relative to the VRP. The principal question of interest was whether the actors stayed within the center of the VRP, or whether they tended to drift toward the boundaries of intensity and frequency. A second question was whether the performance within the laboratory accurately reflects that of a stage performance. The results suggest that some subjects tend to exceed the center of the VRP during the stage performance. It is hypothesized that these actors may stress their vocal mechanism during performance and are more likely candidates for vocal injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)78-83
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Voice
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2005

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Keywords

  • Acting voice
  • Phonetogram
  • Voice range profile

Cite this

Emerich, Kate A. ; Titze, Ingo R. ; Švec, Jan G. ; Popolo, Peter ; Logan, Gary. / Vocal range and intensity in actors : A studio versus stage comparison. In: Journal of Voice. 2005 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 78-83.
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Vocal range and intensity in actors : A studio versus stage comparison. / Emerich, Kate A.; Titze, Ingo R.; Švec, Jan G.; Popolo, Peter; Logan, Gary.

In: Journal of Voice, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 78-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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