Welfare recipients: How do they become independent?

Tyrone Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research used data concerning recipients' employment, receipt of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), receipt of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and poverty status to develop a typology of adaptations by welfare recipients. Using U.S. Department of Labor survey data, a sample of AFDC/TANF recipients was analyzed through event history analysis. The results show that welfare reforms launched in 1996 moved dependent recipients out of welfare but had no effect on working recipients' chances of leaving welfare. New two-year limits on unbroken program participation (and a five-year lifetime limit) pushed many unprepared recipients into poverty, working or not. Economic conditions became worse for working poor people than for those on welfare. The study also found that some former welfare recipients did go to work and eventually leave welfare and poverty. Occupational skills, work experience, child support, marriage, and experience in dependency or supplementation were among the factors promoting such a change.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-170
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Work Research
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2002

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welfare recipient
recipient
welfare
poverty
assistance
typology
experience
marriage
labor
reform
participation
event
economics

Keywords

  • Autonomy
  • Dependency
  • Self-reliance
  • Supplementation
  • Welfare recipients

Cite this

Cheng, Tyrone. / Welfare recipients : How do they become independent?. In: Social Work Research. 2002 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 159-170.
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Welfare recipients : How do they become independent? / Cheng, Tyrone.

In: Social Work Research, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.01.2002, p. 159-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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