When under threat, we all look the same: Distinctiveness threat induces ingroup homogeneity in face memory

John Paul Wilson, Kurt Hugenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current research investigated the well-established outgroup homogeneity effect in face memory (worse recognition for outgroup faces than ingroup faces). Because past research has shown that group distinctiveness threat can enhance ingroup homogeneity, of interest in the current research was whether distinctiveness threat affects face recognition. Across two studies, we found that threatening White American participants' ethnic distinctiveness led to a reduction in same-race face recognition. In other words, distinctiveness threat created ingroup homogeneity in face memory. In both studies, distinctiveness threat led Whites' same-race recognition to drop to cross-race levels. Implications were discussed in terms of how the structure of intergroup relations may drive intergroup differences in face memory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1004-1010
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2010

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threat
outgroup
Research
homogeneity
Facial Recognition
Recognition (Psychology)
Group
Drive

Keywords

  • Intergroup processes
  • Intergroup relations
  • Person perception
  • Social cognition
  • Social identity

Cite this

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abstract = "The current research investigated the well-established outgroup homogeneity effect in face memory (worse recognition for outgroup faces than ingroup faces). Because past research has shown that group distinctiveness threat can enhance ingroup homogeneity, of interest in the current research was whether distinctiveness threat affects face recognition. Across two studies, we found that threatening White American participants' ethnic distinctiveness led to a reduction in same-race face recognition. In other words, distinctiveness threat created ingroup homogeneity in face memory. In both studies, distinctiveness threat led Whites' same-race recognition to drop to cross-race levels. Implications were discussed in terms of how the structure of intergroup relations may drive intergroup differences in face memory.",
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When under threat, we all look the same : Distinctiveness threat induces ingroup homogeneity in face memory. / Wilson, John Paul; Hugenberg, Kurt.

In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 46, No. 6, 01.11.2010, p. 1004-1010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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