Which Middle School Model Works Best? Evidence From the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study

Brian V. Carolan, Christopher C. Weiss, Jamaal Matthews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are few areas of school organization that reflect more dissatisfaction than how to structure the education of adolescents in the middle grades. This study uses multilevel models on nationally representative data provided by the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study to investigate the relationship between schools’ middle-level grade span and students’ math achievement. Classroom quality was considered as an explanation for any relationships between grade span and achievement. Also examined was whether gender and family structure moderated this relationship. Results indicate that there is no generalizable relationship between grade span configuration and math achievement, but that measures of classroom quality predicted math achievement. The results should give reflective pause to reformers considering whole-scale changes to the ways in which grade spans are organized and sharpen the policy focus on classroom quality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)591-614
Number of pages24
JournalYouth and Society
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 6 Sep 2015

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school model
longitudinal study
childhood
classroom
evidence
school organization
family structure
adolescent
gender
education
student

Keywords

  • education
  • educational achievement
  • quantitative methods

Cite this

Carolan, Brian V. ; Weiss, Christopher C. ; Matthews, Jamaal. / Which Middle School Model Works Best? Evidence From the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study. In: Youth and Society. 2015 ; Vol. 47, No. 5. pp. 591-614.
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Which Middle School Model Works Best? Evidence From the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study. / Carolan, Brian V.; Weiss, Christopher C.; Matthews, Jamaal.

In: Youth and Society, Vol. 47, No. 5, 06.09.2015, p. 591-614.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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