Whole language in a foreign language class: From theory to practice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Theoretical perspectives from related disciplines such as early childhood education, bilingual education, and English as a second language education can be valuable in a foreign language education context. This article presents eight philosophical principles needed for implementing a whole language philosophy in a foreign language class and a description of the author's whole language foreign language class (WLFLC) as a practical example. The article outlines the three basic components needed to establish a WLFLC: (1) the classroom setting; (2) the resource books used in the class; and (3) the schedule of instructional activities for the class. The author also presents a description of four major activities used in this WLFLC: (1) language projects; (2) reading children's literature in the foreign language; (3) dialogue journal writing; and (4) portfolio assessment. General conclusions about implementing a whole language philosophy in a foreign language class are provided.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-59
Number of pages8
JournalForeign Language Annals
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2001

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foreign language
language
language education
bilingual education
children's literature
childhood
dialogue
classroom
resources
education

Cite this

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Whole language in a foreign language class : From theory to practice. / Schwarzer, David.

In: Foreign Language Annals, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.01.2001, p. 52-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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